Monday, October 19, 2009

Do You Know That On A Sunny Day, It's Really Hot?

I went out on a walk with my daughter one day after work, and for the most part, it was uneventful. Except for the last quarter mile or so, when I was in wicked pain from the early evening heat (was still in the low 80's and muggy at about 6:30p), which I wasn't too thrilled about.

Anyways, my daughter has a tendency to talk a mile a minute, and within that minute can touch on about a half dozen topics. People would laugh at my running joke at work, which was I would use my daughter as practice so as to better deal with the adults at work. But it really was true. Learning how to pick out bits, pieces and parts from seemingly disjointed ramblings and actually understand well enough to give a proper answer to the question is an excellent talent to acquire.

But I digress. Or do I?

In any event, off on the walk I went with my daughter. After a couple of minutes of false starts (finding brother's C/C and getting my walking stick), we set off on my chose route of walking: in front of the mountain. Why? It was about ten degrees cooler walking in front of the mountain as opposed to immediately walking down the side road.

Within two minutes of starting our journey, she found a stick and commenced to answering the one and only question I was able to ask, nay, the one and only time I was able to start a conversation, which was, "So what did you do today, sweetie?"

From the point on, I never got another chance to initiate a conversation. Jenelle took the ball and proceeded to jam it down my throat. There wasn't any topic that she didn't touch on for the rest of the walk. She even complimented someone on their bowzer.

When we got to the infamous roadblock (as eloquently described here), I decided to make the turn and go down the side street. At the bottom of the hill is where Jenelle uttered the comment that is the title of this post. Believe it or not, after she'd made the statement, I was actually speechless for about fifteen to twenty seconds.

When I recovered, about the only thing I could say was, "Well...yeah." Which was basically ignored, as she continued on her non-stop tangent for the rest of the walk. She covered a dozen more topics, none of which really stood out then or now.

We did manage to properly discard her stick, simply because it broke into two smaller pieces and thus was unusable. And she made an attempt at telling knock-knock jokes and riddles, of which I was able to turn around and give her the case of the sillies.

By the time we got home, it was starting to drift into twilight. I managed to stagger up the front lawn in pain, while erstwhile daughter sprinted up the front lawn and the steps.

All in all, it was a very enjoyable walk, but most importantly, the lesson that I took away from the walk was this: when you choose to go walking with a child on a hot muggy evening, make sure that you're not wearing your work clothes when you're doing it.

23 comments:

  1. Oh, G, U'm still laughing at your post. What a wonderful chatterbox your daughter is. I remember when my daughter was like that, then she turned 12 and the OFF switch was activated. She's almost 27 now and finally talking, TO ME, again.
    What a joy to have someone to walk with. :)Bea

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  2. LOL. I'm always amazed at the energy and resilence of kids. I envy them at times, but at other times I'm glad to be past the sturm and drang, or most o fit.

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  3. What is funnier is that I know adults who provide similar factual information on a regular basis.

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  4. She sounds delightful and you will never run out of anything to talk about. One of my nieces is like that - my dad calls her the "mouth of the south." :)

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  5. lol @ your daughter's comment! And you learned a valuable lesson from it :)

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  6. Bea: She is amazing at that. A ton of energy this child of mine has, what with the dancing and figure skating. Her brain is always going a mile a minute.

    Charles: You ain't kidding about the energy. Sometimes, I get just plum wore out watching do the stuff she does.

    Bear: And most of those work in the government. :-O

    Lynn: Fer shure. If I could only get a word in edgewise, then I might, repeat, might just be able to slow her down.

    Talon: Yes. Never let go of the conversation whenever possible.

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  7. LOL, G! You are a good dad to listen :)

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  8. R.K.: Yeah, I'm just a fountain of misinformation.

    :-O

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  9. That's hilarious, G! Yeah, I had this one student who it took me ten minutes of her lesson just for her to take a breath so I could interrupt and tell her that we wouldn't have a lesson left if she didn't play something, LOL.

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  10. Natasha: You just reminded me of a couple adults from work that I took separate phone calls from. It literally took me two minutes before I was able to find a pause in their rant to say this four words: "Can I Say Something?"

    Mama Z: Without a doubt.

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  11. Kids say the darndest things, no? Still sounds like a great walk & talk!

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  12. Kim, it was a great walk and talk. Well mostly talk on her part and walk on mine.

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  13. I walk often with my daughters too, and this post is exactly why. The talking that happens on these walks is, well, it's priceless. Happy walking to you!

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  14. Joanne: Thanks.

    The times that we do walk together are indeed few and far between. Because our circles frequently do not intersect on a daily basis, it makes it that more special when we can get together like this.

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  15. Ahhh, she sounds so sweet. And what delightful daddy-daughter time, the very best stuff of life.

    I wonder if on a snowy day it might be very cold?? :)

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  16. And on a rainy day, it might be wet. :-O

    Yeah, those moments are few and far between now. What I get now are silly jokes late at night before she goes to bed.

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  17. Hmm that delicious looking food in your header looks like its from Doogies but the background isn't(the Newington one at least). Where and what?? Love the walk with your daughter. I can relate to her actually, I tend to beat around the whole mountain not just the bush to get to any point I'm trying to make. Nice time to spend together though.

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  18. Hi Jeanne: No, it's not from Doogies (I'm impressed that you would know that). It's from a new place that opened earlier this year called "Goldburgers", which can be found on Facebook as well as Twitter.

    I eat there about once a week because the food is so expensive there. High quality though. What you see there costs about $7.50 or so.

    The background is Newington center.

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  19. Soundslike she's a bit spell-binding with the chatter! Sounds like alot of fun. My grandson who's only 4 does that already, too- n i don't know what he's talking about with my cluelessness of his story n toy characters about which he speaks...
    I wish it was still a bit hotter now...

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  20. Very much so.

    Usually I can tune her out to a certain degree, or basically let her say her piece and respond by saying, "that's very good sweetie."

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  21. G one of my favorite scrapbook stores is in your town on Silas Deane Highway. Try to get down there every couple months and hit Doogies while we're there.

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  22. Kewl.

    I have to get to Doogies again. Ever since I discovered Goldburgers, Doogies has fallen by the wayside.

    I think they're pretty much in the same price range, about $10 minimum for a good lunch/supper.

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